What Millennials Want From Work and Life

Leaders are increasingly turning their attention to the millennial generation, whose attitudes and preferences may profoundly reshape workplaces and society.

In the U.S., roughly 73 million millennials were born between 1980 and 1996. Like those in every generation before them, millennials strive for a life well-lived. They want good jobs — ones with 30-plus hours of work a week and regular paychecks from employers. They also want to be engaged in those jobs, meaning they are emotionally and behaviorally connected to them.

In addition to finding steady, engaging jobs, millennials want to have high levels of well-being, which means more than being physically fit. Yes, millennials want to be healthy, but they also want a purposeful life, active community and social ties, and financial stability. Regarding that financial stability, millennials want to be able to spend money on what they want — not just on what they need.

Are millennials getting what they want out of work and life? Not so much.

Gallup’s latest report, How Millennials Want to Work and Live, finds that millennials struggle to find good jobs that engage them. Millennials have the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment in the U.S., and only 29% of employed millennials are engaged at work. Half of millennials say they feel good about the amount of money they have to spend, and less than 40% are what Gallup defines as “thriving” in any one aspect of well-being. Their overall well-being nearly matches that of Gen Xers and baby boomers, meaning millennials have not been able to forge better paths for themselves than many Americans have before them. While the dream of all parents is to have their children lead a better life than their own, not all millennials are positioned for such success.

Read all about it at http://www.gallup.com/businessjournal/191435/millennials-work-life.aspx/

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